In Search of Consistency

Advocacy, activism, and the quest for common ground

In Search of Consistency book cover

In Search of Consistency

Advocacy, activism, and the quest for common ground

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ISBN : 9789004147256
Publisher: Brill (October 2006)

If life is precious, then all life is precious.

In Search of Consistency

This book is about consistency in moral practice with regard to our treatment of life.

In Search of Consistency

Establishing moral codes that respect and protect the comparatively weak from the strong is one of the definitive duties of moral philosophy.

In Search of Consistency

In Search of Consistency is the most comprehensive examination to date of moral theories and animal ethics. This large volume unveils and explores the work of Tom Regan (rights theory), Peter Singer (utilitarian), Paul Taylor (environmental ethics), and Andrew Linzey (theology), not only digging deep into critical analysis of extant theories, but feeding the flames of a now flourishing dialogue at the intersections of animal ethics, environmental ethics, and religious ethics. This book ultimately presents a new approach—the Minimize Harm Maxim, which exposes, through real and hypothetical scenarios, common practices as patently irrational and raises questions few authors are willing to entertain about the way we value life and our attitudes toward death. At every turn, In Search of Consistency reminds that ethics carry an expectation of action, that ethics are intended to guide how we live.

For more about Speaking Up for Animals see:

Introduction to In Search of Consistency

“A bold new vision for animal rights”

“Dr. Lisa Kemmerer offers up a thoughtful critique of existing animal rights philosophies and goes one step further, turning those critiques into a thoughtful and thought-provoking new philosophy. This carefully researched and lovingly crafted book is refreshing in its straightforward approach and unyielding intent to create a more just world for all living beings.”

Stephen Wells on Amazon

In light of a comparatively inclusive dominant ethic concerning human life and moral standing, and in light of the conspicuous absence of any morally relevant distinction between all humans and every other living entity, the conclusion is inescapable: All living entities ought to be acknowledged as morally considerable.

In Search of Consistency