Eating Earth

Environmental Ethics & Dietary Choice

Eating Earth

Eating Earth

Environmental Ethics and Dietary Choice

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ISBN : 9780199391844
Publisher : Oxford University Press; (October 2014)

This book should be given as a compulsory reading at university in all science related subjects.
Highly recommended.

Silvia Agostini, educator

This is a most important book concerning our meal plans and how our choices have a devastating impact on many different ecosystems.

Marc Bekoff, renown author, professor emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Eating Earth pulls together facts and data that feminists, critical animal studies, and sustainability scholars have all cited but have never been able to reference easily, collected in one single publication.

Dr. Greta Gaard, author of Critical Ecofeminism

Eating Earth offers a concise examination of the environmental effects of dietary choice, clearly presenting the many reasons why dietary choice ought to be front and center for environmentalists.

Green Woman

… combines moral discussion with scientific analysis and historical perspective as she examines the problems of our food system and how to solve them.

Food Ethics Made Easy

Eating Earth systematically documents the devastating effects of anymal agriculture, fishing, and hunting, conclusively demonstrating that any sincere and informed environmentalist will also be vegan. This hard-hitting, concise book includes 44 summary slides and 34 graphs and diagrams underscoring and clarifying key ideas, simplifying scientific and mathematical data. The narrative of Eating Earth is highly readable—clear and straight-forward—with a healthy dose of wry humor.

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Introduction to Eating Earth

Synopsis: Eating Earth

Food choices are the number one determinant of an individual’s environmental footprint.

Eating Earth

Eating Earth

Introduction by Lisa Kemmerer

WHEN I WAS in my twenties on a Watson Fellowship that took me to the Tibetan Plateau, I met an Irishman at a low-end restaurant. We had din- ner together. Though each of us had met many other people in our travels, there was something magnetic about our connection—I refer to the nega- tive ends of a magnet. We disagreed about pretty much everything. At the time, I would best have been described as a budding philosopher, ethi- cist, atheist, feminist, and animal liberationist; he was a scientist, math- ematician, born-again Christian, and environmentalist. Ideologically we had almost nothing in common, but since we had both been traveling for months with little opportunity to speak English (and even less to engage in meaningful discussions) we spent our days together . . . and argued almost perpetually . . .   Read more

In our day-to-day lives we often act without thinking, behave without thoughtful intent, and live without conviction. This is nowhere more evident than in our eating habits.

Eating Earth